By Lorna Heynike, Senior Vice President of Marketing, Callidus Software

Announcing the launch of Sales Selector

In our last blog post, The Case for Hiring Scientifically, we discussed the challenges front line sales managers face in their attempt to locate and secure the best talent, all while reducing hiring risks, costs, and time. In this discussion we will explore how 2.0 technology tools are transforming the way we source and secure talent.

Sales recruiting is highly competitive and what separates the best in class from the laggards is the use of 2.0 recruiting processes. Here are some of the tools that early adopter organizations are putting to use:

2.0 Recruiting: Leveraging smart search technologies, sales managers can now recruit candidates who aren't sitting in their inbox with an application filled out, expanding the net of qualified candidates dramatically. Based on the data available on LinkedIn and other professional social networks, managers can generate candidate lists with high relevance to their position (industry, technology, sales process, role, geography, selling style) - before the job post even goes out. This ensures each sales manager has the best, most relevant candidate list to start with, rather than only those candidates who saw the job post and applied.

2.0 Interviews: Using online videos also allows hiring managers to spread their net wider without taking up too much time. Videos enable hiring managers to replay, review, and easily perform a side by side comparison of multiple candidates answering the same experience-based sales questions, all without having to leave their computer. These videos also have a "force multiplier" effect—by sharing a recorded interview with colleagues in the approval chain, managers can elicit feedback from a larger group of people to arrive at a better decision.

2.0 Assessments: Here are some statistics that you may find interesting. The Aberdeen Group reported that 86 percent of best-in-class organizations use validated assessments in the pre-hire stage. These organizations saw on average 18 percent more of their organizational goals achieved and 15 percent more of their new hires achieving their first performance milestone on time.1

Our research indicates that there are 18 groups into which sales positions can be categorized (read a free whitepaper on these selling styles). Online assessments indicate what types of selling situations the candidate is best suited for, describes their sales temperament, and determines whether the candidate is suited for sales in the first place. There's no foolproof way of finding superstars in sales, but assessments give you keen insight into the candidate's temperament (competitiveness, sociability, drive, independence) – something that's hard to assess in your average interview. What's more, your smart search will tell you if you the assessment got it right based on the candidate's public recommendations and digital profile.

2.0 Sales Teams: Hiring managers already are sitting on a wealth of data—the digital profile of their top performers. By capturing the profiles of their top performers, managers can draw a relationship between temperament, skills, and behaviors and draw a relationship to real business outcomes. Then, by benchmarking new candidates against their top performers, managers can better assess the likelihood of success for different positions based on proven high performance in the organization.

These are the technologies we set out to provide in our new solution Sales Selector. Try it out with our free trial and let us know your feedback. We'll keep you posted on our updates as we go.

1 Assessment 2011, Selecting and Developing for the Future, Aberdeen Group, 2011